John Stewart

John Stewart

John Stewart is Director of Economic Affairs at the Home Builders Federation (HBF)., HBF

John Stewart is Director of Economic Affairs at the Home Builders Federation (HBF).

His policy responsibilities include the economy, the housing and mortgage markets, mortgage regulation, NewBuy, demographic trends, housing supply, Affordable Housing, new home valuation, the private rented sector, customer satisfaction and the industry's Consumer Code, the Cumulative Impact of Regulation on viability and supply and Homes and Communities Agency (HCA) initiatives (FirstBuy, Get Britain Building, public land disposal). He maintains close contact with a wide range of housing experts, including officials at the Department for Communities and Local Government (CLG), the HCA, HM Treasury and the Bank of England.

Before joining HBF in 2003 he was an independent housing consultant for over ten years, and previously divisional Sales & Marketing Director for house builder Wates. His publications included a monthly Viewpoint column in Housebuilder and Building a Crisis (2002) which highlighted the growing housing supply crisis in England and began to consider its social and economic consequences.

He has an MA in English from Auckland University and an MSc in Economics from Birkbeck College, London.

Post Brexit migration controls

Post-Brexit migration controls

May 3, 2017

John Stewart revisits the ongoing arguments surrounding immigration levels post Brexit, looks at the challenge of getting household projections right and focuses on the affordability crisis facing the young

Historic shift in new housing's economic role

Dec. 1, 2016

John Stewart looks back at the shift in attitude towards the economic role of new housing over the past four decades

Brexit will not diminish need for new homes

Brexit will not diminish need for new homes

Nov. 1, 2016

Cuts to inward migration following Britain's exit from the EU in 2019 will not reduce the need for much higher levels of new home building over a sustained period, says John Stewart

Brexit will change the shape of UK economy

Sept. 1, 2016

Britain’s vote to leave the EU will have profound longterm implications for the UK economy, the housing market and the new homes industry, says John

Planning permissions key to increased sales

Planning permissions key to increased sales

July 1, 2016

Larger housebuilders have significantly increased their sales per site since the trough, but active site numbers have remained almost static. Further increases in sales and production will require increases in planning permissions, says John Stewart

Housebuilding needs solutions, not threats

May 1, 2016

If the private sector is to build enough homes to help solve our long-term housing crisis, it needs positive incentives and the right demand and supply policies. Threats to force faster building will lead to sharply lower housebuilding levels, argues John Stewart

Lies, damned lies and statistics

Lies, damned lies and statistics

April 1, 2016

To judge whether we are on track to meet the government's 1 million housebuilding target, we need accurate statistics. The current situation is far from satisfactory, argues John Stewart

Delivering the PM's 1 million housing target

Delivering the PM's 1 million housing target

March 1, 2016

With a fair economic wind, the industry should be able to achieve the prime minister's 1 million housing target by 2020, provided we solve a number of major barriers to supply, particularly industry skills and local authority planning resources, says John Stewart

Restoring supply's responsiveness to demand

Restoring supply's responsiveness to demand

Feb. 1, 2016

A proper presumption in favour of residential development for all brownfield land within settlement boundaries would help restore the market responsiveness of private housebuilding, generating a significant increase in housing supply and supporting a recovery in SMEs, says  John Stewart

Home buyer mix changing

Home buyer mix changing

Dec. 1, 2015

Trends in the housing market and housebuilding are driven by slow moving medium to long term trends and more volatile short term influences. John Stewart looks at recent evidence